Archive for the ‘Etiquette’ Category

Golf Handicaps: Exceptional Play Cut…

Sunday, September 6th, 2020

 

NEW TSG HANDICAP RULE: EXCEPTIONAL PLAY CUT…

 
The exceptional play cut scoring calculation will be triggered when a player shoots four shots below his or her handicap. 

This will be an additional cut to the one given by the TSG Handicap System when you add your scorecard to the website.

 Please inf below a chart we have put togther in order for members to greater understand how and why this calculation is performed by our system.

We’ll be sending out more information once this new calculation goes live from 1st January 2020 but its also worth noting that in November 2020, we will be moving over tot he new World Handicap System.

However, please note, that at the time of going to press, there is still over 500 clubs still waiting for their course to be remeasured to account for the new Slope Rating.

NEW TSG HANDICAP RULE - EXCEPTIONAL PLAY CUT...

The exceptional scoring calculation will be triggered when a player shoots four shots below his or her handicap. This will be an additional cut to the one given by the TSG Handicap System when you add you’re score…

Exceptional Play Handicap Calculation - The Social Golfer - golf Handicaps

N.B. Calculation based on formula used by CONGU

For more information on the way UK Golf Handicaps are calculated visit England Golf >>

 

NOTE: The Social Golfer is in no way affiliated in any way to CONGU or any other UK golfing organisation and we reserve the right to make our own local rules.

However, for those that wondering where we have taken our guide for this new addition to our Handicapping formula, please find below an extract from 2019, UHS (Unified Handicapping Manual)

 

EXCEPTIONAL SCORING REDUCTION (ESR)…

 

“It is accepted within the UHS that a player may on occasion return a low nett Qualifying Score. Such a score will automatically attract a handicap reduction within the UHS, relative to the player’s Handicap Category.

However, if a player returns more frequent low scores than would be expected for their Handicap Category this probably indicates a significant change of golfing ability.

This can occur, for example, if a beginner or junior golfer is rapidly improving, if a player’s circumstances have changed allowing him/her to play more competitive golf or if an initial handicap allotment has been made based on the limited information available on a new Member’s golfing ability and requires a realignment.

The ESR mechanism makes a further reduction in the player’s handicap, based on both the level of the scores returned and their frequency, in accordance with the Exceptional Scoring Reduction Table below.

When a player returns a Qualifying Score with a Nett Differential of -4, or below, in a calendar year this triggers the ESR algorithm, setting an initial marker.

An ESR calculation will be initiated the next time a Nett Differential of -4 or lower is returned by the player. The average Nett Differential of the two scores is then compared to the number of rounds in the sequence to establish an ESR.

For this reason reductions of less than one stroke may be recommended as, when combined with the decrease applied by the system, the overall reduction will always be more than one stroke. The case for applying an ESR increases as the average of the two Nett Differentials becomes lower and the number of scores in the sequence reduces”.

 

 

What the members say about the new  TSG Exceptional Play Cut…

 

I think TSG has done a decent job of treading that very fine line between promoting the social aspect of the game (nobody can deny it’s gone from strength to strength!) whilst simultaneously providing a range of  fair and competitive functions including the monthly leaderboard and the Exceptional Play Cut calculation rule” 

 

Matt Coffey – Handicap 9

 

Sportswear Embroidery, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 4

5 Top Tips for choosing a new Sportwear Embroidery supplier…

Wednesday, August 19th, 2020
Golf and Sportswear Embroidery, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - sept 2020

When thinking about getting sportswear embroidery on your team kit or sports garments, workwear or other clothing, what are the 5 core things you should consider when choosing an embroidery company?

As any Golf Society organiser or sports team manager knows, what you wear and the quality of the sports attire you choose, can make a real difference to how you perform. 

In addition, with so many companies (local or national) providing an embroidery service, how do you know which one to choose? 

In 2020, The Social Golfer appointed Sportwear embroidery specialist Portlantis as our preferred supplier. 

Why? A combination of reasons.

Firstly, we were impressed with how helpful they were. From the moment we spoke, we knew they really wanted to provide us with a top-quality service. 

However, once we moved beyond the niceties, these were our core considerations…

  1. The quality of the product and range available
 
  1. The quality of the sportswear embroidery
 
  1. The price & delivery costs
 
  1. The turnaround time
 

For us here at The Social Golfer, the price was important, but more important to any golfer is the styling and fitting.

Rather than pretend to know everything there is to know about branded sportswear, we asked Trudy Reynolds (Managing Director at Portlantis) for her top 5 tips for choosing a new embroidery supplier. 

Over to Trudy to discuss all things sportswear embroidery…

Sportswear Embroidery, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 4

When The Social Golfer first asked me to write a
‘blog’ for their members, I really didn’t know where to begin as there are so many variables when it comes to my industry.
 

However, I thought it best to start by saying how thrilled we are to be working with the team at The Social Golfer.

We really do get excited when it comes to new embroidery and printing on clothing, caps and bags – and we love a new project! 

 

Mobile payments, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 4

Portlantis has 15 years’ experience in the garment decoration industry. 

All manufacturing takes place in-house at our premises in Devon (which is also home to some great golf courses like Royal North Devon GC and Saunton GC), and we supply sportwear to Golf societies and sports clubs all over the UK. 

In fact, if it’s fabric we can logo it – we recently embroidered some great hole flags for two courses at Hulencourt in Belgium.

In addition, we will be shocasing our sportswear embroidery on TSG gear at Celtic Manor in Spet 2020.

What do you need to decide to make an informed choice of Golf & Sportswear Embroidery?

Golf and Sportswear Embroidery, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 (1)

Fabric…

In 2020, technology has advanced so that we now have a fantastic range of fabric to choose from. 

Whilst plenty of golfers stay with traditional cotton when it comes to polos, there are also fabrics like the Coolplus Performance TM, Permanent Wicking Fabric which draws moisture away from the skin to keep you cool on and off the course.

This easy-care fabric doesn’t need ironing and comes with a flat knit collar, taped neck, self-coloured buttons and side vents for easy movement. 

And it doesn’t stop with polos – if you need jackets, sweaters or a new gilet, then we can advise about the latest styles and fabrics for those items too.

 

Sportswear Embroidery, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 4

Decoration…

 

Most garments have left breast embroidery with the golf club or golf society logo, but we often embroider the right breast or sleeve with individual names or initials too. 

 

Having the destination and date of your society trips on your shirts is also very popular. Complex logos and multiple positions equal higher stitch counts – so do be aware, that the price will rise a bit if you increase the decoration. 

 

But our polos are usually worn again when off the course, so are often seen as good value – and it’s easy for the organiser to spot his group in the airport bar, if they are all wearing the same thing!   

 

 

 

Sizing… 

 

Sizing between brands can vary hugely.

 

For example we supply a French brand called Sols which comes up significantly smaller than some of the American brands. 

 

Nothing is more frustrating than ordering and paying for your polo, only to realise it’s a little tight or way too big when it arrives. 

 

At Portlantis, we are always very happy to send out samples, so you can test sizes before you buy. 

 

 

Contrasting Colours…

 

It’s always good to test colours before approving an order.

 

Which is why we provide all our customers with photographic samples to be sure you are happy, before completing your order. 

 

In fact, we don’t mind sending you a stitched logo on a ‘swatch of fabric’ via Royal Mail.

 

So you can see your logo at first hand before it goes onto all your garments.

 

 

 

Mobile payments, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 4

Price…

 

This can vary hugely but you don’t always have to spend big to get the best. 

 

Many factors affect the price, inlcuding fabric choice, colour, size, quantity and timing.

 

We’ll work with you to get the most from your budget and find the best solution for you and your team.  

Things Portlantis can provide to any golfer or golf society in terms of sportswear embrodiery…

Polo Shirts: 

As mentioned above, probably the most common order we get from golfers is a society shirt. This can be provided in any colour and fabric. To stand out more, why not add a special message to your club logo.

Baseball Caps:

Every golfer’s wardrobe includes caps and we have selected a 100% cotton twill cap from headwear specialist Beechfield, available in a variety of colours. This six-panel cap has ventilation eyelets and is easily adjustable with a tri-glide buckle on the fabric strap at the rear. Caps are worn for their practicality of course, but the branding to the front and back allow you to fly the flag for your club or society. 

Shoe Bags:

Need somewhere to store your shoes? Made of hard wearing 210D polyester, this water-resistant fabric has reinforced corners and drawstring handle, an inexpensive and essential addition to your golfing wardrobe.

Gym Bags: 

Perfect for putting wet or dirty clothing in after your round, and for keeping separate from your clean clothes. It can also be used as a good alternative to a shoe bag.

Golf Towels: 

No golf bag is complete without the ever-practical golf towel. We offer a luxury version in navy, in 100% ringspun cotton, with excellent absorbency qualities.

 

5 Top Tips for choosing a Sportswear Embroidery, Golf Gear, Golf Clothing, Teamwear, Logo, Portlantis - june 2020 (1)

Finally, Portlantis is proud of our relationship with golf societies and Golf Clubs around the UK and we love talking to new customers. 

Please get in touch if you need any sort of bespoke items for your events and trips.

Contact Trudy on trudy.reynolds@portlantis.com or direct on 07795 565975

Why golfers can carry 14 golf clubs in their bag…

Tuesday, March 10th, 2020

14 golf clubs - The Rules and The Penalties - The Social GoflerEver wondered why you are allowed to carry up to 14 clubs in your golf bag?

And who made this rule? And why?

Here we look at some of the history and rationale as to why 14 is the magic number…

 


The reasons why golfers carry 14 golf clubs in one bag – The History…

It doesn’t matter if you use a golf carry bag or a golf stand bag, Callaway, Sun Mountain or Ping golf bags, most golfers know that you can have up to 14 golf clubs in it.

However, it’s not so common for people to know why, and they don’t really ask.

The truth is, it hasn’t always been like this – the rule of carrying up to 14 clubs was first introduced in 1938.

Before that time, golfers could bring as many clubs as they wanted.

Did you want 20 or 30?

Well, as long as your caddie could carry it, it was alright.

Before the 1920s the number of carried clubs hadn’t even been an issue, but in 1924 the first player in the golf history decided to use a steel-shafted club in the US Open.

This new club could ensure a longer flight without making a golfer give up control over it.

However, many players didn’t want to drop the hickory-shafted clubs that they knew so well so they simply decided to bring them all to the tournaments.

So why did The USGA (the United States Golf Association) and the PGA (Professional Golfers’ Association) decided to regulate it?

There were several reasons, though all of them related…

 


Four reasons why golfers carry 14 golf clubs in one bag – When and why…

 

1.    To Unburden caddies…

The average number of golf clubs brought by a single player to the US Open and Amateur in 1935 was 18.

The highest total record was set in the same year when one golfer carried 35 clubs with him (a right-handed set and a left-handed set, just in case).

Or, to be precise, had his caddie carry them for him.

After that, the USGA decided that something needs to be done to limit the number of clubs a single player can bring to one match.

The caddies being overloaded and simply exhausted were one of the reasons for finally regulating it.

2.  To down-skill the game…

Since the very beginning, golf was primarily about the skills and the idea was to keep it that way.

The USGA and the PGA didn’t want some players to seem better than others simply because they may have had many various clubs.

The goal was to keep the game as challenging as possible and not to leave all the answers to technology and gear.

3.  To avoid inequality…

Apart from the caddies’ health, the USGA and the PGA also worried that too many different clubs carried by a single player can make him or her unjustly superior to those who couldn’t afford all kinds of different sets of clubs.

They wanted to avoid inequality based on social and financial background.

4.  Apparently, 14 is enough to have the whole set…

Steel-shafted clubs were much easier to customize than hickory-shafted ones, so when the steel finally appeared, matching sets were introduced to the market.

The very first set was created by a Scottish manufacturer, George Nicoll, who decided to number the clubs from one to nine – and other producers followed shortly after.

Then, all nine were traditionally played along with one putter and four wooden clubs. All that made up 14 clubs that we are allowed to use up until this day.

 


14 golf clubs - The Rules and The Penalties - The Social GoflerThe reasons why golfers carry 14 golf clubs in one bag – The Penalities…

Well, of course. If there’s an official rule, there must be a penalty for breaking it.

In this case, it’s two strokes for each hole where there were too many clubs in a golf bag.

It means that, even if you don’t know that you have too many clubs and you don’t realize until you’re playing the second hole, you will get penalized for both of them.

However, it’s the maximum penalty, so you won’t ever get more than four strokes.

If you realize in the middle of playing one hole, it will be assessed at the end of it, and to the last one if you’re between holes.

It’s a bit different during the Match Play where the penalty is one hole, and the total match score is changed, not only the hole you’re currently playing.

 


The reasons why golfers carry 14 golf clubs in one bag – Does the type of clubs matter…

No. As long as you keep the overall number of clubs up to 14 and they all conform to other regulations, it doesn’t matter how many of each type you have.

Choosing the types accordingly to the game, to your skills and preferences is the whole other thing that you should sacrifice your time to.

A lot of golfers still stick to the traditional set of nine irons, four kinds of wood or Hybrid and one putter.

 


 The bottom line…

It’s also worth noting that there’s no minimum as to the number of clubs you can carry in your bag.

But still, the bottom line is that, if you want to succeed, you don’t just have to be good at what you’re doing – you need to know all the rules.

Something, not all golfer seem to know!

 


By Haper Stanbridge

Read about the new rules of golf launched in 2019 >>

 

Paul Houghton – Disabled Golfer & TSGer sues Brentwood Council…

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Paul Houghton on buggy

TSGer, Paul Houghton, and his case against Brentwood Borough Council for discrimination (on account of him not being allowed to use his buggy at Hartswood Golf Club) have now been taken on by top lawyer Chris Fry.

The BBC interviewed Paul on 3rd September 2018 and all the major news organisations have picked up on the story that we first highlighted in 2016…

Dec 2016 – Discrimination-in-Golf.

Paul joined The Social Golfer in 2014 and has been an active and welcomed member ever since.

In 2017, The Social Golfer sponsored Paul and fellow disabled golfer Roger Hurcombe, helping them to fund their competitive golf.

Here’s what the BBC wrote about Paul Houghton’s case….

———————————————————————-

Golfer, Paul Houghton, who is disabled and who uses a prosthetic leg, is suing a local council for refusing to let him play on its course using a buggy.

Paul Houghton’s right leg was amputated in 2000 after he was affected by a lethal tissue-eating bacteria.

Mr Houghton learned to walk again – and golf became an important part of life but he still also uses crutches and a wheelchair.

He claims Brentwood Council in Essex discriminated against him but the council is defending the legal action.

Paul is lucky to be alive.

In November 2000, while working as a roofer, he knelt in contaminated water and contracted the deadly flesh-eating bug necrotising fasciitis. It consumes muscle and body tissue at a rate of 0.75in (2cm) an hour.

“The surgeon told me he had to operate immediately,” Paul told the BBC.

“He said that he had no choice but to continue cutting until he was certain he had removed all the infected tissue.”

“I had just two hours to prepare myself for an operation that at best I would survive with a leg missing, but at worst I would not survive at all.”

His right leg was amputated above the knee, and he received the last rites in hospital.

In all, he had five operations – some for skin grafts because his amputation was very rushed and the perfect stump could not be formed.

Paul could not continue to work as a roofer and his business closed.

Paul Houghton – Disabled Golfer – Represented England.

He requalified and now works for Chelmsford Council as its access officer in building control.

He learned to walk with a prosthetic limb and switches between it, wheelchairs and crutches.

However, overuse of the crutches causes shoulder injuries, while the prosthetic leg can cause pressure sores that are difficult to cure.

Paul has represented England at disability golf 13 times, with a handicap of 14, and has played on courses across Europe.

Because of his disability, he needs a buggy in order to play an 18-hole course.

In August 2016, Paul had booked to play a round with a friend at Hartswood Golf Course in Essex.

It is owned and operated by Brentwood Council.

Paul Houghton sues Brentwood Council - Hartswood Golf club

On his way to the first tee, he claims he was told he would not be allowed on to the course without a letter from his doctor justifying the medical need for a buggy.

If he obtained such a letter he was told he would be given a certificate allowing him to use his buggy.

Paul Houghton – Disabled Golfer – What he said.

“I was gobsmacked he told the BBC.

“I’ve played over 100 courses around England, I’ve played all around the world and I’ve not been treated in this way before.”

Paul says he explained that he had his own insurance, a European Disabled Golf Association card, and a medical exemption, but the club insisted that he needed a letter from a doctor to justify the use of a buggy.

It sends the message that disabled people aren’t welcome, that we are not part of society, not included, but are segregated and can’t join in a sport that’s accessible to everybody, because we need to use other equipment to play the game,” Paul says.

In his legal claim, Paul argues that by refusing to allow him to use a buggy without a doctor’s letter, the council discriminated against him because of his inability to walk around the golf course.

In effect, he claims the council was applying a policy that indirectly discriminates against all disabled people who need a buggy to play golf.

Brentwood Council denies any discrimination and is defending the legal action.

The council said it was “committed to ensuring safe access for everyone to all its facilities” and would issue a full statement when legal action had concluded.

Paul Houghton – Disabled Golfer – Lawyer’s view.

Paul Houghton’s solicitor, Chris Fry from the firm Fry Law, said: “This case is more than just about making a service more accessible; it’s a reminder of the importance of the benefits which sport brings to social inclusion, together with physical and mental health.”

“This is especially important for people with a range of disabilities, and not least mobility impairments.”

“A simple adjustment in this case will benefit Paul, and thousands of others in a multitude of ways.”

In its “Buggy Use Policy”, England Golf, the governing body of amateur golf, says it “wishes to encourage the participation in golf of all players regardless of disabilities”.

This, it says, is in accordance with its obligations under the Equality Act.

Cae Menai-Davis, co-founder of the Golf Trust, a charity that works with disabled groups to make golf more inclusive, commented: “Golf is a sport for everyone.”

“Making it difficult for a disabled golfer to use a buggy isn’t just bad policy, it is bad business.”

“There is a huge untapped group of people with learning and physical disabilities that want to play the game and will benefit hugely from it.”


Paul with trophies

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Just some of the new outlets that have covered Paul Houghton in the last 24 hours…

The BBC

The Times

The Sun

The Telegraph

The Independent

The Week

The Daily Mail

The Metro

Epping Guardian

 

Golfing in Northern Ireland…

Monday, November 13th, 2017

Golfing in Northern IrelandThere are numerous destinations around the world to visit and play golf but closer to home, have you ever consider golfing in Northern Ireland?

Northern Ireland may be famed for its championship links golf but it also possesses glorious parkland courses.

Beyond capital Belfast’s five parkland beauties there’s a wealth of inland courses for golfers to play throughout the region.

Some of them are at golf resorts where the fairways are just steps away from your room, while others are unsung jewels just waiting to be discovered by visitors.

Golfing in Northern Ireland – The Resorts…

There are three main golfing resorts in Northern Ireland, all of them offering extensive golf facilities as well as accommodation, bars, restaurants, recreational activities – and full-service spas with massage treatments, to help ease those aching muscles after a round or prepare the body for the next golfing foray.

Just 20 minutes from Belfast, and only 10 minutes from Belfast International Airport, the Hilton Belfast Templepatrick Golf & Country Club incorporates a 129-room four-star hotel and a par-72 golf course that stretches to over 7,000 yards.

Designed by former European Tour pros David Jones and David Feherty, it opened in 1999 and challenges golfers with a mix of lakes and mature trees. Other golf facilities include a floodlit driving range, short game practice area and two practice putting greens.

The resort also has a spa and health club, both of which were refurbished in 2014.

Located on a 600-acre peninsula between Lower Lough Erne and Castle Hume Lough in the Fermanagh Lakelands, Lough Erne Resort comprises a five-star hotel and the Faldo Championship Course – six-time Major winner Sir Nick Faldo’s first design in Ireland – that opened in 2009, as well as a second 18-hole course, the Castle Hume.

The resort also has a golf academy featuring a private golf studio equipped with video and ball-tracking analysis.
Lough Erne Resort opened in 2010 and has 120 rooms, suites and loughside lodges.

Its Thai Spa offers a dual treatment room ideal for couples, with treatments including a two-hour Golfers Tonic massage.

The resort’s Catalina Restaurant is named after the World War II flying boats that were based on Lough Erne.

Lough Erne Resort welcomed world leaders including Barack Obama, Vladimir Putin, Angela Merkel and David Cameron when it hosted the G8 summit in 2013.

The Roe Park Resort lies in the beautiful surroundings of the Roe Valley Country Park. It is just a short drive from 2019 Open Championship venue Royal Portrush and other top links layouts as well as the Causeway Coast’s world-class visitor attractions, among them the Giant’s Causeway, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

The 18-hole parkland course gives golfers views of the Sperrin Mountains and Lough Foyle from elevated holes. Its par-3 6th hole recently underwent extensive work including a new two-tier green as part of £1 million renovations to the course. Facilities also include an academy
and high-tech indoor teaching studio.

Formerly a stately country house dating to 1729, Roe Park Resort’s four-star hotel opened in 1995 and offers 118 rooms and suites, two restaurants, including its restored 18th century Coach House, and a spa that is a teaching academy for Elemis. The resort offers a Couples Escape package that includes dinner, bed and breakfast plus a mud skin treatment for two followed by a couples massage.

Although not connected, Galgorm Resort & Spa is close by for those playing golf at Galgorm Castle Golf Club and it features a new riverside Thermal Village. A couples package includes bubbly and truffles on arrival, use of the Thermal Village and a Deluxe Duo treatment, with optional four-course meal and a cocktail or glass of wine. The resort was the host hotel for the Dubai Duty Free Irish Open
in 2017, played at Portstewart Golf Club.

Golfing in Northern IrelandGolfing in Northern Ireland – Other clubs in the Area…

Galgorm Castle Golf Club is laid-out through mature wooded grounds in the heart of the 220-acre Galgorm Castle Estate, alongside its 17th-century castle.

It stages the annual Northern Ireland Open, part of the European Tour’s Challenge Tour.

More than 40,000 people watched the free-to-enter the tournament in 2017, a record for the tour.

A new Fun Golf Area at Galgorm is aimed at families and features a six-hole pitch and putt course and the Himalayas putting green, a scaled replica of the famous St Andrews attraction.

Among Northern Ireland’s best-kept golfing secrets, Kilkeel Golf Club is a picturesque parkland layout at the foot of the Mourne Mountains in the far south-west that has played host to qualifiers for the British Amateur and Senior British Open events.

When golfing in Northern Ireland, the region also boasts several centenarians outside of Belfast.

They include: Massereene Golf Club, established in 1895 and offering a challenging course on the shore of Lough Neagh; Newtownstewart Golf Club, founded in 1914 and laid out through venerable oaks and beech trees in the Baronscourt Estate, home of the Duke of Abercorn; Tandragee Golf Club, dating back to 1911 on the Duke of Manchester’s Estate with bunkers including some resembling America’s Great Lakes that were designed by the Cincinnati-born Duchess of Manchester; and Omagh Golf Club, which was extended from a nine-hole course built in 1910 to 18 holes in 1983.

Other gems include County Down golf clubs Rockmount, St Patrick’s, Warrenpoint, Edenmore and 36-hole Clandeboye, County Antrim’s Lisburn Golf Club and Country Tyrone’s Dungannon Golf Club.

Golfing in Northern Ireland

Golfing in Northern Ireland – The seaside courses…

Several excellent seaside courses lie in the shadows of renowned venues.

Just around the coast from the celebrated Royal County Down, the short but spectacular Ardglass Golf Club links hugs the rocky shore and cliffs, with several holes offering views across the bay to Coney Island.

Golfers can enjoy the craic after their round in the bar of the oldest clubhouse in the world, originally built as a castle over 600 years ago and with cannons pointing out over the fairways just in front.

Kirkistown Castle Golf Club, on the Ards Peninsula, is the closest links course to Belfast and was designed by legendary architect James Braid, while Ballycastle Golf Club, a mix of parkland and links, lies opposite Rathlin Island on the Causeway Coast alongside the ruins of 500-year-old Bonamargy Friary.

Cairndhu Golf Club is a parkland course with several holes right by the sea, its signature, par-3 2nd hole ending in a green perched on a rocky headland.

However, few courses can match the historic connection enjoyed by Foyle Golf Centre, on the outskirts of Derry below the Donegal Hills.

Its championship parkland course is named after aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart, the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic.

She made an emergency landing at the end of her historic flight in 1932 on what is now the 6th green of the Earhart Course.

Whatever your preference, golfing in Northern Ireland is a hit!


By Ian Mullins

Golf Events in Ireland…

How to calculate your Golf Handicap…

Tuesday, October 31st, 2017

How to calculate your golf handicap?There a number of ways to calculate your golf handicap either via a recognised CONGU® Club handicap OR alternatively, golfers can use an Online Golf Handicap Tracking Platform such as the one offered by The Social Golfer.

However, be aware that Online Golf Handicap calculations are NOT approved by CONGU® (The Council of National Golf Unions).

But how do you calculate your golf handicap?

How to calculate your Golf Handicap – CONGU®*…

One of the unique things about golf is that unlike many sports, golf has a handicapping system that allo

ws players of varying abilities, to play against one another in a fair and equal manner.

In short, your golf handicap is….. the number of shots you would expect to take when playing a round of golf compared to a player who has no handicap e.g. someone whose handicap is 0.

This is not as difficult as you might think if you take a short time to understand the CONGU® system.

If you are a member of a club that is affiliated to one of the ‘Home Unions’ (ie, the governing body for golf in England, Ireland, Scotland or Wales), then you are eligible to have a CONGU® handicap.

To get your first OFFICIAL handicap you will need to complete 54 holes of golf (this may be any combination of 18- and 9-holes*) with your card marked by someone who understands the Rules of Golf. (e.g. The Club Manager, Club Pro, Club captain, a committee member or another member).

Once your rounds are completed the ‘handicap committee’ will consider the scores you have made and, taking into account any previous golfing experience you may have had as well as any other sporting achievements, will ‘award’ you a handicap.

Then, every time you play in a qualifying competition your handicap may go up or down.

How to calculate your Golf Handicap – HANDICAP CATEGORIES*…

How to calculate your golf handicap?

Handicaps are divided into different bands – called categories.

Depending on which category you are in, the amount your handicap can go down varies.

Also, the amount you can play over your handicap (called buffer zone) varies before your handicap increases.

Category 1

Golf Handicaps of 5 or less

Buffer Zone = 0 to 1 shot

Adjustment factor = 0.1

Category 2

Golf Handicaps of 6 to 12 inclusive

Buffer Zone = 0 to 2 shots

Adjustment factor = 0.2

Category 3

Golf Handicaps of 13 to 20 inclusive

Buffer Zone = 0 to 3 shots

Adjustment factor = 0.3

Category 4

Golf Handicaps of 21 to 28 inclusive

Buffer Zone = 0 to 4 shots

Adjustment factor = 0.4

Category 5 (N.B. This category is for Women Only – they can have a Handicap fo Up to 36)

Golf Handicaps of 29 to 36 inclusive

Buffer Zone = 0 to 5 shots

Adjustment factor = 0.5

N.B. Everyone’s handicap is calculated to 1 decimal place but their playing handicap is the nearest whole number.

E.g. David’s exact handicap is 22.1 and his playing handicap is 22. Sue’s exact handicap is 10.5 so her playing handicap is 11. 3

How to calculate your golf handicap?How to calculate your Golf Handicap – Other things to know…

If you play ‘below’ your handicap, your handicap will be reduced by a certain decimal point for every shot under (see categories above).

However, if you play above your handicap (i.e. more than your expected GROSS Score, your handicap will be increased by 0.1.

You are allowed some leeway (this is your buffer zone – see categories above for different buffer zones), but once you are above your buffer zone, your handicap goes up.

The Good news is that no-one is expected to be able to play to their handicap for every round.

There is some flexibility: if you play within your buffer zone your handicap will not alter.

Under CONGU® rules, every time you compete in a competition you should return your card.

This is firstly so the competition organiser knows that you have played in the competition and secondly because the organiser may want to check your marker’s score which is on your card.

It is against the spirit of the game to put your poor scorecard in your pocket and drive home.

As already noted, it is your responsibility to play off the correct handicap. If you believe you have played under your handicap you must calculate your new handicap before playing in another competition.

Finally, when moving between handicap categories, the calculation gets a bit more complicated.

However, this is when The Social Golfer Handicap System** comes into its own. Just add your scores after every round and let our Handicap calculating system do the rest.

Once you have added your scores, TSG PRO account holders can then print off a copy of their TSG Handicap Certificate.

So there you have it, no more arguments on the first tee about who’s playing of what handicap!

 


By Ian Mullins

* source via www.congu.co.uk

**While The Social Golfer Handicap system is calculated using the similar formula as CONGU®, it is paramount that golfers know that no online handicap system is sanctioned by CONGU® and can therefore not be used in official club competitions. However, Online Golf Handicap Certificates are widely accepted as a ‘proof of playing’ standard by most clubs for casual play.

How to obtain a golf handicap certificate…

Thursday, October 5th, 2017

Golf Handicap CertificateEvery golfer wants to know what their real playing ability is but if you don’t belong to a golf club, how do you obtain a golf handicap certificate?

We asked the team at the TheSocialGolfer.com to explain what they offer the golfing nomad…

How to obtain a golf handicap certificate…

Firstly, let’s set the record straight, a CONGU (The Council of National Golf Unions) recognised handicap is the ONLY official way to get a golf handicap certificate.

However, in many ways, this is expensive, as it requires you joining a golf club, which can cost you upwards of £600 – £2000 per year!

Secondly, a much more affordable option is to join an online golf club like The Social Golfer (TSG)…

The Social Golfer has its own bespoke Golf Handicap Tracking system, which invites you to submit three of your most recent scorecards, following which it will then produce you an official TSG Golf Handicap Certificate.

Thereafter, we recommend members post their scores after EVERY round to maintain their current playing standard.

Our system takes into account both your Gross Score and the SSS (Standard Scratch Score) of the Course and adjusts your playing ability accordingly.

How to obtain a golf handicap certificate – Is it robust and accurate?

Absolutely!

We recently surveyed our members who are club members with a CONGU handicap and compared them with their TSG handicap and a resounding 100% of those asked, said their handicap on The Social Golfer was LOWER than their Club handicap!

How to obtain a golf handicap certificate – Are TSG Handicap Certificates accepted at Clubs and in Open Competitions?

Yes!

Golf Handicap CertificateSince our launch in 2010, we have never heard of a club refusing our golf handicap certificate either in the UK or Worldwide.

However, whilst some Open Club competitions and Golf Society Days will request a CONGU certificate, many clubs are recognising that with club membership on the decline in recent years, that an online handicap is more than an adequate replacement.

Furthermore, with Club handicaps only requiring you to submit three scorecards per year (total), the TSG handicap system, calculates your ‘actual’ playing standard after every round.

A golf handicap certificate with The Social Golfer costs £24.99pp*

Looking for the birthday or Christmas gift for the golfer in your life?

Buy a membership to The Social Golfer – Click here


*correct at the time of going to press.

Discrimination in Golf – Game takes huge step back….

Monday, December 12th, 2016

discrimination in golfWe know golf is always some years behind the rest of the world in its moral outlook maybe it should have been no surprise, when I recently experienced (in our opinion) a truly awful show of ignorance by my local council toward Paul Houghton – TSG’s very own Disabled golfer.

Having got to know some disabled golfers pretty well over the last few years, we stupidly thought discrimination in golf was a thing of past….

Discrimination in Golf  – Setting the scene…

Now and Paul and myself play a couple of times a year together, so was very pleased when he agreed to play at my local municipal course (which is one of the best in the South East).

Having extolled the values of this super little course to Paul many times, he may have brought a little too much expectation with him on the day.

However, I had no idea what was about to unfold.

Here’s our story in Paul’s own words with some excerpts from the letter he sent to the local council officer (N.B. Real names and places have been replaced) …


discrimination in golfDiscrimination in Golf  –  The Story….

Dear Sir or Madam, 

I was invited to play golf at your municipal course by a resident of your borough. This is his local course but he is not a member.

On a Saturday in August, we arrived to play at the allotted tee time that we had booked. I introduced myself in the Pro shop and paid for my round.

I was told to present my chit to the starter in his hut.

As I left the Pro shop the man behind the counter ‘Dave’, followed me out and told me that I would not be allowed onto the golf course using my Electrokart.

A little surprised I asked why this was, as I possess my own public liability insurance for the vehicle and possess an EDGA tour card (European Disabled Golf Association) for which I had to have a medical for through England Golf.

‘Dave’ was very quick to reply, stating that without proper paperwork, he could only take ‘my word for it’ that I am disabled.

I replied asking “Could he not accept the fact that my leg is missing as proof?”

“No, the Council say I must have the proper paperwork before we let you on the course”.

You won’t be surprised that my initial response is not printable.

Slightly rattled by my determination to not back down and slightly panicked by the thought a lawsuit was already winging its way to his employers….

‘Dave’ quickly scanned the council website (not the Golf Course website – which has no information!) and stated that all the information was available online.

Now the paragraph on the council site is less than clear but does state that a letter must be obtained from the players ‘Doctor’ to justify the use of a buggy. 

As I am an above knee amputee it seems pretty damn obvious of my impairment (my leg also make a tinny sound when you smack your driver against it) but ‘Dave’ stated that it was a ‘Council’ ruling and I would still not be allowed on the course without the proper documents.

(This document would take a matter of weeks to obtain and a Doctor would charge for the letter!).

He also indicated that I would be required to cross a road, which cuts through the course which can be dangerous, but surely that is the same for all golfers?

So how is this all helping golf to be seen a progressive, accessible sport for all?

At this stage, I thought it right to mention to ‘Dave’ that my day job is actually working as a Disability Officer for the neighbouring council and that I know the disability laws inside out.

At which point the blood drained from ‘Dave’s face! (Sorry, maybe I shouldn’t have mentioned this at the start of the debate!)

The local council concerned needs to impact assess their procedure in this respect, in line with their Duties towards the Equality Act 2010.

What I experienced on that Saturday in August was gross ignorance as to attitudes towards disability, the situation was handled very poorly and much of my day was ruined. 

As a keen golfer, I have played all over Europe and have never been refused onto a course other when weather conditions inhibit it due to safety. 

To say I was stunned is an understatement. 

My playing partner and host were more shocked, not to mention embarrassed on his and my behalf!

To avoid any more stress for all parties, I decided to cut my losses and asked for my money back, ‘Dave’ retorted that ‘he’ was not discriminating against me.

When I said this was ‘blatant’ discrimination, he said you are only saying that because of ‘that’ pointing to my prosthetic leg”. 

Yours Sincerely…

 

Paul Houghton


discrimination in golfDiscrimination in Golf  – Our View…

You couldn’t make it up, could you!

Discrimination in any walk of life is unacceptable and discrimination in golf turns our stomachs just as much…..

Shortly after receiving his email and letter, Paul quickly received the council’s response……they offered him a free round of golf and have asked if could help them review their wording on their website – hang on, isn’t that your job!

As all TSG members know, we promote equality and diversity, so to hear and experience a day in the life of a disabled golfer ourselves was a shock, to say the least.

Sadly, after four months, Paul is still yet to receive any kind of response or justification from the council as to how they plan to prevent this issue in the future.

Paul is considering legal action but that requires a lot of self-motivation – something he would probably prefer to channel through his golf!

PLEASE SHARE THIS POST WITH ALL YOUR GOLFING FRIENDS AND LET’S STOP THIS IGNORANCE NOW!

For more information on Golf for all, visit England Golf’s Equality and Diversity page.

By Ian Mullins


Footnote: Paul lost his leg suddenly sixteen years ago in a work accident whereby his leg was amputated above the knee. However, being the gritty character that he is, Paul decided to take up golf.

He later joined the Disabled Golf Association and has now represented his country 12 times, playing of a respectable handicap of 16. He works hard to promote understanding and empathy for disability and hates any form of discrimination in golf!

 

Sharing a Golf Buggy – Confessions of a Golf Addict Pt 3

Monday, August 15th, 2016

Sharing a Golf Buggy

Let me introduce myself, my name is Paul and I’m a golf addict!

Playing golf socially with friends can be a pleasing experience, add a bit of competition and it makes the experience even more enthralling. Sharing a Golf Buggy with unknown opposition is an entirely different matter!

Sharing a Golf Buggy– It all started with such good intentions…

I’ve now been playing golf for a couple of years just monthly, in the society about ten times a year.

My handicap has stuck at the agreed 32 mark; I’m not really competing at events but still thoroughly enjoying my new past time. The golf shop in Chelmsford market (sadly no longer there) is a source for new or second-hand equipment.

I’ve now secured a set of graphite Mizuno TZoid clubs, a mix and match group of woods and rescues, with a broom handle putter.

John the proprietor of the golf shop spots my enthusiasm and tries to assist in me acquiring all the right gear.  The putter is his idea, he also states that Henry Cotton had all his clubs the same length something I should consider?

This we did, I traded in the Mizuno’s (after a few rounds) for a set of Callaway Hawk Eyes which he fitted to all the same length other than the sand and gap wedge. So it was me who inspired Bryson Dechambeau!

Anyhow now clad in my new golfing attire and with the newly fitted clubs I arrived at Burnham Golf Club fit for purpose or so I think.

I’m drawn in a group of golfers who were playing off circa 15, so quite handy players.

On chatting to one of the players, we discuss why I should have taken an iron on the tee at a par three instead of the rescue, which I have hit too long.

It becomes apparent very quickly that I have no idea how far I hit the ball with each club; in fact I am focusing so much on hitting the damn ball, that direction is irrelevant.

The respect I have been offered by the society for playing on one leg has waned; quite rightly they think I should be improving from the handicap they gave me.

A bit disenchanted I finish the round in a lowly 14th, 3rd from last.

One of the group approaches me in the car park, his father is disabled and plays golf regularly.

He says “Paul my old Dad has his own golf buggy and plays regularly“… “I’m sure you would improve if you had a buggy and contemplated joining a club?”

I thought carefully at what has been said…do I take the plunge and join a club, how much would all this cost?

Firstly I would need to purchase a buggy and perhaps take a few lessons?

I have never had any natural ability at sport, I’ve always had to work hard to achieve anything involving games.

I’ve played chess for Essex a game my father taught me at an early age, I studied openings out of chess books, played both Nigel Short and Murray Warren both chess grand masters, but my claim to fame was beating Terry Marsh the fighting fireman.

Terry retired as unbeaten Welterweight world champion and was also a very good chess player.

As usual, I digress, nevertheless the pep talk from these society members kick-started me into action, I know now that I  want to be as good a golfer as I can!

Sharing a Golf BuggySharing a Golf Buggy – Who are you…

So a quick trip onto ebay reveals a single seat golf buggy for sale in Kent, with a few days I am its new owner.

Golf buggies for older or disabled players are as important as the clubs in your bag.  In fact, a lot of us cannot play the game without the blasted things.

Sharing a double buggy can be an interesting experience, and one I do regularly… my reasoning for getting my own single seat machine follows…

The Pro’s:  It allows two of you the bliss of being together for 4 or more hours. (Great if you both get on) even better if you hit the ball in the same direction. It can keep the rain off, save you energy; keep you cool and can make for quick golf.  They also allow you to carry loads of refreshments, and stacks of golf balls.

The Cons: They can be expensive to hire and you may be forced to sit next to somebody you don’t like for four or more hours also the driver maybe so bad that you cannot concentrate on your golf for fear of drowning in the lake the driver did not know existed until you careered towards it, or fear being crushed as you assume the wall of death position, while circumnavigating the side of a bunker while your buggy partner attempts to re-enact the Indianapolis 500.

On many occasions, I have considered leaping out away from the runaway death trap while the driver (talking on his mobile phone) hairs toward certain doom, utterly oblivious of the 200-foot drop he is driving towards!

Attracting the attention of a golf buggy driver is not an easy affair.

I was introduced to ‘Steve’ at the club house, he seemed a decent enough chap and was to be my buggy companion for the day, although I did notice he was chain smoking.  Anyhow we were out in the fresh air.

Steve apologised just before we set off, that he was a cricket nut and would need to listen to the test match (through headphones) on his Walkman.

Sharing a Golf BuggySharing a Golf Buggy – Check their credentials…

What he also failed to tell me was he did not have a driving licence!

Off we set with clouds of smoking billowing from the exhaust of the machine and from my playing partner Rothmans Super King size cigarette as we back-fired our way down the first fairway. (From the air we must have looked like a damaged Battleship in the attack on Pearl harbour).

Conversation was impossible amongst the smoke and noise from the engine, which was as fine-tuned as a dumper truck.

That we found our balls was a miracle, the suspension on this bone cruncher, had nigh shattered my eye sockets, my vision was so blurred by the smoke and the lurching ride made me feel dizzy it was like getting off a fairground ride.

I went to select my club, bang went the exhaust Steve was off in clouds of smoke like a dragster as Santa Pod, Steve!!

The two walking players in this four ball looked over in disgust at the commotion we were making.

Steve had played his shot, while being unplugged I managed to attract his attention by wildly waving my arms like a demented Morris dancer.

Steve realising that I was stranded clubless, fired up the ‘Mad Max’ sound alike buggy and proceeded to deafen this part of Essex.

Through smoke, petrol fumes and the smell of nicotine, I tried to play a good round, it was like playing golf during the Battle of Waterloo.

Steve was so engrossed in his cricket, he was not conscious of the commotion we were causing.  “100 for two he barked, Cooke’s got a half century”.

I just managed to pull my head in a Steve drove us through a Hawthorn bush, it spines tearing at the fragile fibreglass structure.

Out came the sandwiches followed by a flask,…”Tea?” bellowed Steve, who was all of a foot away.

Is this what sharing a golf buggy is about?

He proceeded to continue driving the bone shaking brute sloshing tea from a thermos cup, clutching an egg sandwich in the other hand; his mouth was still puffing on the near dog-ended grout!

FFS Steve!” I screamed you’re going to kill us, he had the look of ‘possessed demon’ in his eyes.

We had arrived at the next hole. “Cooke’s got 75 now” he muttered as he left the buggy parked half way up an elevated tee on a 1 in 2 camber.  I scaled out of the cabin more like a mountaineer than a golfer!

My nerves shattered from this eventful game I succumbed to just getting around the course intact without the need of medical attention.

All thoughts of a good golf score were long gone.  Just as I started to relax as we puffed along yet another fairway … I felt a stinging sensation on my chest!

Looking down I thought I was going to see the tell-tale sign of a black and yellow insect, but to my horror I saw smoke coming from my shirt I was on fire!!

Stop the kart!” I hollered while trying to put out the flame that was now coming from my shirt, Steve looked across and grinned removing the now dead fag from his teeth, “Cooke’s got his hundred”.

“I’m on fire you fecking idiot!” I tore his ear-piece from his right ear… pouring water over the coin size hole in my shirt, the smell of singed chest hair hit my nostrils.

It was hot ember from Steve’s now dogend fag that had been the culprit.  I leapt from the buggy as soon as we came to a standstill rolling on the ground like an agitated puppy.

After the carnage had be dealt with, and tempers had subsided (Steve apologised and promised to buy me a new shirt) he went to get back in the cart and replace his ear plugs; I put my arm across his chest …. “Steve, I’m driving!”

Sharing a Golf Buggy – The next step…

Next month, I finally join a golf club and am confronted with rules and golf etiquette!

—————————————————————————————————————–

Paul Houghton is a member at Riverhall Hall Golf Centre where he plays off 17. He’s also a member of the Disabled Golf Association andEuropean Disabled Golf Association; he has represented England nine times in tournaments.

My Golf Obsession – Confessions of a Golf Addict Pt 2…

Saturday, June 11th, 2016

Paul Houghton - My Golf ObsessionLet me introduce myself, my name is Paul and I’m a golf addict!

My Golf Obsession – When did my golf addiction really start?

Someone once said, “The key is to learn from failures and then keep going!”

Well back in the late 90’s Scuba diving was my thing. I loved nothing more than hauling on a dry suit and submerging myself into the murky waters of Stoney Cove or Gildenborough water.

In the summer, I’d brave the Channel and other exotic destinations….

As life does it throws you a curve ball. I picked up an infection at work, (remember I was a roofer) the long and the short of it was I was diagnosed with Necrotising Fasciitis (the Flesh eating Bug).

However, after what I like to refer to as ‘my lost weekend’ I emerged from hospital minus 5 stones in weight… and my right leg above the knee.

What’s all this golf to do with golf you say? Bear with me….

Paul Houghton - My Golf ObsessionMy Golf Obsession – What I did next…

After my amputation, I did return to scuba diving but it’s a tough sport with two legs, let alone one. I did do a three and a half mile charity swim for McMillan but my love of this adventure had waned somewhat.

I needed a different challenge…

Enter Amputee Football. This started but I met the England national team amputee goalkeeper (as you do), he  only had one arm!

He put me in touch with the Southend United Amputee Football team manager and I was part of this circus for three years.

Amputee football is seen as too dangerous to be included as a Paralympic sport, so right up my street.

Over the next  three years; I rose to the heady heights of Chairman of the club but again life made some changes and it was time to move on….

Paul Houghton - My Golf ObsessionMy Golf Obsession – You look like a golfer!

A colleague of mine at work used to shout out; “You look like a golfer!” every time I limped past his desk.

He was recruiting for the Council’s golf society. “How can I play golf I’d answer?

Plenty of one-legged golfers out there he’d retort“.

This went on for some time, one day he made his usual demand; I stopped looked him in the eye, and said, “OK, put me down for your next event“.  It turned out to be Manor of Groves, Hertfordshire.

Now, ‘time’ had moved on in golf club technology, the Slazenger XTC’s were no longer state of the art equipment.

In fact, when I dug them out from the back of the garage, they were not exactly in what you would call in tip top condition either.

But they will have to do I thought. It had been roughly 12 years since I have hit a golf ball, so off to The range I went.

Paul Houghton - My Golf ObsessionMy Golf Obsession – Starting again…

Earlier I mentioned a quotation, which actually came from Sir Ranulph Fiennes. A man I deeply admire. So learning to swing a golf club with a bit missing can’t be that hard….can it?

Memories of those eventful outings with CT came flooding back.  This time around, I intended keeping the ball in play a bit more.

Life on a prosthetic leg can be kind of interesting.  The opportunity of crashing down onto terra firma is never too far away. Balance and stability are key to standing upright and keeping your remaining limbs unbroken.

Introduce the golf club, and life for the leg amputee gets slightly trickier.

I had a little over a week to nurture my swing into a competitive stroke, allowing me not  to look too foolish at the society bash.

The basic principles to hitting a golf ball on one leg are the same as with two.

Obviously over swinging is going to cause loss of balance, so having a more conservative swing with more focus on ball contact makes a lot of sense.

So with a few basic fundamentals in place I turned up at Manor of Groves anxious that I would not make a complete fool of myself.

What a day it was it was! It was a scorcher as the temperature rose into the 90’s, the other society members gathered. I knew a few from work to say hello but none you would call friends.

I was introduced to the captain, given a card “What’s your handicap?” said the secretary discreetly looking at my prosthesis which gleamed from my shorts.

I don’t have one!” I exclaimed. In the past CT and I had played off 18 but that was wishful thinking even then).

“OK how about we try you off 32!”

Seemed fair to me (although I didn’t think I could be more than 28?!).

Paul Houghton - EDGA - TheSocialGolfer.com

My Golf Obsession – It’s the leg, honest…

I was introduced to the four-ball I was playing with….

As you all know, Social golf is a great way of meeting new friends but being the new boy and being half robot does make you feel slightly apprehensive.

A suction socket on Prosthesis is sufficient in everyday life but for sporting activity and on a hot day, air expands and the stump gets sweaty.

So you tend to let out a fart like sound every time you get up from a chair especially getting out of a golf cart – what would these guys make of me?

I shared a bacon roll with my four-ball partners and made my excuses so as to collect my golf bag and get a buggy.

Thrupp off went my leg… charming the lady member of the four-ball exclaimed, my face reddened.

On the tee, I joined my colleagues, hit a scruffy shot down the fairway and took a big sigh of relief.

Thrupp went the leg; my female playing partner looked at me with disdain.

After a few holes, I was getting exceedingly hot, I had secured a few points and the two chaps I was playing with were nice enough, but the lady was a bit fierce.  She was a good player and very competitive.

On one hole she hit her ball into the rough; I thought she had given it up, so returned to my ball in front on the fairway.

She was very hot and bothered and hollered that she could still score if only she could find her ball.

I returned to help her search…Thrupp went the leg “That’s not nice” she exclaimed, “It’s very undignified“.

I can’t help it!” I offered…Thrupp! We played on.

Now this lady was very well-endowed and she was perspiring heavily. Her shirt had become very sweaty in the chest area and was becoming a bit see through.

About this time the others players arrived to help in the search. Hands on her hips she ripped into them (one of them must have stared, a bit too intently at her now semi-transparent shirt on course etiquette).

Are you looking at my chest she demanded!”  Thrupp! I tried to move uncomfortably away from the now intense debacle …only to hear her shout again “Will you stop farting, you rude man!” she screamed!

Needless to say, the rest of the round was a little tense, but I thoroughly enjoyed myself.

Paul Houghton - EDGA 2015

Paul Houghton – EDGA 2015

My Golf Obsession – Back at the Clubhouse…

Shooting well over a 100 I was pleased to contribute a few points into the match even if I was last.

I declined the club cleaning service offered, as I feared the rust and dirt were holding the clubs together.

I left early from the meal careful only to let my stump give out a gentle ‘Thrupp’ as I got up from the table.

I saw my male playing colleagues look over smiling, my female companion was not.

Is that your leg making that noise?” someone asked…

You’ll never know I replied!” and hastily made my exit.

My golf obsession had begun!

———————————————————————-

Paul Houghton is a member at Riverhall Hall Golf Centre where he plays off 17. He’s also a member of the Disabled Golf Association and European Disabled Golf Association; he has represented England nine times in tournaments.