Archive for the ‘Health & Fitness’ Category

The Social Golfer Monthly Newsletters…

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

The Social Golfer Monthly Newsletter v2

Welcome to The Social Golfer Monthly Newsletters…. plus catch up on the latest developments on the website.or look back at TSG history…

In addition, you can look back at The Social Golfer Monthly Newsletters history, find out who won what and who played who….

 xxx


Have you signed up to The Social Golfer Monthly Newsletters?

Rest assured, this is not a vehicle for us to send you unsolicited promotional offers like some sites but a great coffee time update on all site goings on and the winner of TSG monthly leaderboard along with tips and advice from our own PGA Pro contributors!

Click the link below then tick “Send me the The Social Golfer monthly newsletters” (N.B. You can unsubscribe at any time!)

Ps. Got a story you’d like us to feature? Fancy having a go at writing something yourself? We’re always keen to hear from TSG members. Send us your stories to theteam@thesocialgolfer.com

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Pro Tips – Psychology of Golf…

Saturday, April 16th, 2016

Psychology of Golf

As we approach the new season, we start with the year discussing the  ‘Psychology of Golf’ and how to prepare yourself mentally for the season ahead.

Psychology of Golf – The basics…

I’m not going to give a lesson in ‘winning‘ or ‘how to get in the zone‘ here (although if you would like to improve that side of your game, I can help!).

Here I am going to give you some ideas about playing smart – i.e. course management.

Golf being the frustrating, euphoric, and mind boggling game it is, (and that’s just one hole!) you will find yourself in many different situations.

Too many to cover in this blog, but I will cover some common scenarios you may find yourself in.

Psychology of Golf – Thick Rough…

This can be your friend or your foe, all depending on your lie.

If the ball is sitting up and the grass around you isn’t too long, you may want to hit a wood or hybrid and get the ball as far up the hole as possible, as it is effectively sitting on a tee.

This assumes you are far enough away from the green that you need a fairway wood.

If the grass is really thick and/or long (think, The Open) and you have a bad lie, your first point of call is to look for the fairway and the shortest possible route to the fairway.

Sometimes this may be backwards or even onto another fairway, an option I see few amateurs use. In terms of club selection, get some loft in your hands; use a sand wedge or pitching wedge.

If your lie is average you need to assess how much thick rough you can go over and get up the hole and still get the ball on the fairway – but DO NOT bite off more than you can chew.

Your goal here is to make sure your next shot, IS from the short grass!

Psychology of Golf – Trees…

Vila Sol

Anytime you go in the trees, look up, you may find an apple to eat.

You may also see a gap in the trees to hit through! It is time to assess your situation, can you punt the ball up the fairway (or even reach the green)?

And if so, how big is the gap?

You need to be very honest with yourself in this situation, can you see yourself being able to hit the ball through the gap?

If there is any hesitation in your answer or a hint of a no, it is onto option 2.

Option 2, is chip the ball out sideways, it is rare you cannot find a big enough gap you feel confident chipping the ball through and back onto the fairway, but there are times there isn’t.

You need to look at maybe hitting onto another fairway or going slightly backwards.

Club selection in the trees is important, more than likely you want to keep the ball low under the branches (including chipping out).

So make sure you take a longer, lower lofted club to make sure your ball flies out the trees untouched.

Psychology of Golf – Fairway Bunkers…

Course designers like to play with our emotions and see our high soaring drives take a dodgy bounce and end in a bunker.

If this happens to you, make sure you get the ball back in the fairway.

As with all these shots, it is about ensuring you do not have the same shot again. So get your sand wedge out and play it like a greenside bunker shot so you are back on the fairway, ready to hit the green.

So there you have it, thinking about the game or the ‘Psychology of Golf’ before you start the season –  the mental part of the game is just as important as your swing!


Andy Clissold - TSG Head Pro

Andy Clissold – TSG Head Pro

 

By Andy Clissold – Head TSG Pro.

If you have a specific shot you struggle with contact Andy at andrew_clissold@hotmail.com

 

Pro Tips – First Tee Nerves…

Monday, April 20th, 2015
First Tee Nerves

First Tee Nerves

It’s a balmy Saturday in Summer and you are about to play in your first TSG official event. How are you feeling on the first tee? Are you suffering from first tee nerves? Just want to get it away? Make sure you don’t top it?

You are not alone…

If any of these thoughts sound familiar then lets get you feeling more comfortable on the first tee. The first thing to realise is everyone feels it! If you ever get the chance to read an interview with a tour player, they will tell you they too get first tee nerves. The difference is they are trained on how to hold those nerves.

Addressing your first tee nerves…

What we are going to talk about in this blog is a really good visualisation technique to improve your confidence. It is something you can do at home, five minutes a day that will transform the way you think about your golf.

Firstly you need to get yourself relaxed, so have a few deep breaths and close your eyes.

It is important to build the picture first and uses ALL your senses; imagine the first tee, you’re walking up to the first tee, feel your legs moving, the weight of your bag, you can see your mates, hear the crunch of the gravel, smell the freshly cut grass, taste the coffee on your tongue as you take a sip.

And now on the tee…

Now you’re on the tee, as above, hear, see, feel, smell, taste everything, from you putting your bag down, getting a ball out your bag, teeing it up.

From this point, I’d like you to imagine yourself feeling confident, standing tall!

Go through your routine and picture a pure, high drive down the middle. (Be realistic with this, there is no point imagining a shot you can’t hit!).

Feel yourself being confident as you stand to the ball and feel a really good swing, hear and feel the connection with the ball. Imagine seeing your shot flying into the middle of the fairway – your friends saying “shot”….no first tee nerves here!

The more times you do this, you brain will think its real, believe it has actually happened! So when you come to do it for real, your brain believes you can hit a good shot, in fact, it won’t expect anything else.

Give it time and be patient….

First time you try this you may find it is not overly effective, but visualisation is a skill that you need to work at.

As I said, five minutes a day is all it will take and over a week or two the images will become more and more vivid and real. The more real the image, the better for helping improve your first tee nerves and building your confidence.

So FIVE minutes while you’re waiting for the bus, FIVE minutes a day not using Facebook – do some visualisation and start nailing those first tee shots!

By Andy Clissold

Golfing Injuries – explained…

Sunday, July 27th, 2014
golfing injuries

Tennis Elbow

As an active member of TheSocialGolfer.com, I spend the majority of my weekends playing golf and as qualified Physiotherapist, I spend a lot of time discussing fellow members golfing injuries – and occasionally treating at whichever club we are at!

As such,  I thought it might be good to get some information out to everyone, as I’m sure picking up  any golfing injury is very frustrating.

Not only does it prevent you from enjoying your golf but at worst, stops you playing …. however, don’t despair that personal best score could be just around the corner!

It may surprise you that the most common golfing injuries I see in clinic is not in fact Golfers Elbow (Medial Epicondylitis) but Tennis Elbow (Lateral Epicondylitis). This is followed closely by Shoulder and Back pain, which is more expected.

This is followed closely by Shoulder and Back pain, which is more expected.

Golfing Injuries – What are Golfer’s and Tennis Elbow?

As the medical Latin name suggests, the pain is situated around the Epicondyle, which is the knobbly bony bit (very technical) that you can feel on both the outside and inside your elbow and where, if you suffer from it, the pain will be situated.

In between this and the main point of your elbow is where the tendons sit.

Tendons are like pulleys and levers and are the main load baring structure in any joint. So, as you can imagine, the amount of strain that goes through it during a golf swing will cause irritation.

As you get older, these tendons begin to wear and become more irritated, so the more you play, the more it can become inflamed.

Golfing Injuries – What can you do if you get this type of pain?

There are a number of methods out there that are discussed and bandied around.

However, after seeing probably around 5,000 of these things, I feel well placed to suggest my method is most effective!

You can try ultrasound, acupuncture and strengthening exercises, all of which have some use, however they need to be used in conjunction with Manual Therapy.

As one TSG member Colin Samuels, would testify, this is agony, but clears the pain in the session.

Under normal circumstances, I would expect four sessions to be effective, as part of a full management strategy.

I would work into the tissues and areas that are affected (the sore part) and then give you a tailored management plan to ensure you are pain-free.

Golfing Injuries – Will you need an injection or surgery?

In all my years of being qualified, I have NEVER had to send a single patient for an elbow injection for any form of golfing injury (yet!).

I feel very strongly that these should always be last resort and am confident that our approach to treatment  can avoid this.

Although I do perform injections myself, I always try to avoid it where possible, as the side effects and outcomes are not always great.

Golfing Injuries – Where can I go to get treatment?

I work for a company called Physioworld, which has clinics all over the UK.

If you would like to speak to me about treatment in one of our 200 clinics or if you would just some advice, please call me on 07768 865 089 or email me at Ben.Fykin@Physioworld.net

By Ben Fykin