Archive for December, 2016

G/Fore launch new designer golf bag….

Thursday, December 15th, 2016

G/Fore Golf Bag

We love it when new golf products are launched into the market – so we were very interested to learn more when we heard about the new G/Fore golf bag!

The new ‘Transporter’ G/Fore golf bag features weatherproof matte leather, tonal onyx black logos and quilted patent leather front pockets making it the ultimate luxury stand bag in a sleek, black design.

It is available exclusively on the G/FORE website with international shipping, which will launch by the end of the year (2017).

Priced at around £260 and weighing six pounds (2.7kg), the bag can also be customised with embroidered name or initials on the front pocket for an extra £20.

Manufactured in collaboration with Vessel, it is also brimming with features including a cooler pocket, an inner valuables pocket with two combination lock, magnetic tee pocket, patented Rotator Stand technology allowing maximum stability and a double equilibrium strap.

Having forged its identity on brightly-coloured, high-quality gloves and eye-catching footwear and apparel, the G/FORE brand – created by fashion industry pioneer Mossimo Giannulli in 2011 – has made significant strides in its first few years on the golf scene.

And this latest addition allows golfers to show off even more of their G/FORE style.

G/Fore golf Bag – What they said….

Mossimo Giannulli said: “We are very excited about our new golf bag collaboration with Vessel. Vessel’s innovative golf bags paired with the clean aesthetic of G/FORE makes for the perfect combination.”

To view the brand’s full range of apparel, gloves, shoes and accessories, visit www.gfore.com

By Ian Mullins


 

G/Fore Golf Bag – Company history…

G/FORE logo 9_14– Mossimo Giannulli – who is married to Full House and Summerland actress Lori Loughlin -founded G/FORE in 2011 after becoming frustrated in his search for colourful and functional golf gloves.

– A fashion industry veteran and avid golfer, Giannulli founded the billion-dollar clothing company Mossimo Inc in 1987 and brokered a first-ever designer-exclusive distribution deal with Minneapolis-based Target Stores in 2000.

– G/FORE embodies Giannulli’s expertise in fashion, passion for golf, and dedication to creating products of unmatched performance and unparalleled style.

– G/FORE’s first few years have seen it grow from crafting colourful gloves to also producing premium golf shoes, apparel and accessories for both men and women.

– In just a few short years, the G/FORE brand has been worn by a host of top-level professional golfers, award-winning actors and music industry stars.

– G/FORE golf gloves are worn by professionals every week on the PGA, Champions, European, Japanese and LPGA Tours.

– In spring 2016, Bubba Watson joined G/FORE’s line-up of elite ambassadors.

 

Discrimination in Golf – Game takes huge step back….

Monday, December 12th, 2016

discrimination in golfWe know golf is always some years behind the rest of the world in its moral outlook maybe it should have been no surprise, when I recently experienced a TRULY AWFUL SHOW OF IGNORANCE by my local council toward Paul Houghton – Disabled golfer.

Having got to know some disabled golfers pretty well over the last few years, we stupidly thought discrimination in golf was a thing of past….

Discrimination in Golf  – Setting the scene…

Now and Paul and myself play a couple of times a year together, so was very pleased when he agreed to play at my local municipal course (which is one of the best in the South East).

Having extolled the values of this super little course to Paul many times, he may have brought a little too much expectation with him on the day.

However, I had no idea what was about to unfold.

Here’s our story in Paul’s own words with some excerpts from the letter he sent to the local council officer (N.B. Real names and places have been replaced) …


discrimination in golfDiscrimination in Golf  –  The Story….

Dear Sir or Madam, 

I was invited to play golf at your municipal course by a resident of your borough.This is his local course but he is not a member.

On a Saturday in August, we arrived to play at the allotted tee time that we had booked. I introduced myself in the Pro shop and paid for my round.

I was told to present my chit to the starter in his hut.

As I left the Pro shop the man behind the counter ‘Dave’, followed me out and told me that I would not be allowed onto the golf course using my Electrokart.

A little surprised I asked why this was, as I possess my own public liability insurance for the vehicle and possess an EDGA tour card (European Disabled Golf Association) for which I had to have a medical for through England Golf.

‘Dave’ was very quick to reply, stating that without proper paperwork, he could only take ‘my word for it’ that I am disabled.

I replied asking “Could he not except the fact that my leg is missing as proof?”

“No, the Council say I must have the proper paperwork before we let you on the course”.

You won’t be surprised that my initial response is not printable.

Slightly rattled by my determination to not back down and slightly panicked by the thought a lawsuit was already winging its way to his employers….

‘Dave’ quickly scanned the council website (not the Golf Course website – which has no information!) and stated that all the information was available online.

Now the paragraph on the council site is less than clear but does state that a letter must be obtained from the players ‘Doctor’ to justify the use of a buggy. 

As I am an above knee amputee it seems pretty damn obvious of my impairment (my leg also make a tinny sound when you smack your driver against it) but ‘Dave’ stated that it was a ‘Council’ ruling and I would still not be allowed on the course without the proper documents.

(This document would take a matter of weeks to obtain and a Doctor would charge for the letter!).

He also indicated that I would be required to cross a road, which cuts through the course which can be dangerous, but surely that is the same for all golfers?

So how is this all helping golf to be seen a progressive, accessible sport for all?

At this stage, I thought it right to mention to ‘Dave’ that my day job is actually working as a Disability Officer for the neighbouring council and that I know the disability laws inside out.

At which point the blood drained from ‘Dave’s face! (Sorry, maybe I shouldn’t have mentioned this at the start of the debate!)

The local council concerned needs to impact assess their procedure in this respect, in line with their Duties towards the Equality Act 2010.

What I experienced on that Saturday in August was gross ignorance as to attitudes towards disability, the situation was handled very poorly and much of my day was ruined. 

As a keen golfer, I have played all over Europe and have never been refused onto a course other when weather conditions inhibit it due to safety. 

To say I was stunned is an understatement. 

My playing partner and host were more shocked, not to mention embarrassed on his and my behalf!

To avoid any more stress for all parties, I decided to cut my losses and asked for my money back, ‘Dave’ retorted that ‘he’ was not discriminating against me.

When I said this was ‘blatant’ discrimination, he said you are only saying that because of ‘that’ pointing to my prosthetic leg”. 

Yours Sincerely….

 

Paul Houghton


discrimination in golfDiscrimination in Golf  – Our View…

You couldn’t make it up, could you!

Discrimination in any walk of life is unacceptable and discrimination in golf turns our stomachs just as much…..

Shortly after receiving his email and letter, Paul quickly received the council’s response……they offered him a free round of golf and have asked if could help them review their wording on their website – hang on, isn’t that your job!

As all TSG members know, we promote equally and diversity, so to hear and experience a day in the life of a disabled golfer ourselves was a shock, to say the least.

Sadly, after four months, Paul is still yet to receive any kind of response or justification from the council as to how they plan to prevent this issue in the future.

Paul is considering legal action but that requires a lot of self-motivation – something he would probably prefer to channel through his golf!

PLEASE SHARE THIS POST WITH ALL YOUR GOLFING FRIENDS AND LET’S STOP THIS IGNORANCE NOW!

For more information on Golf for all, visit England Golf’s Equally and Diversity page.

By Ian Mullins


Footnote: Paul lost his leg suddenly sixteen years ago in a work accident whereby his leg was amputated above the knee. However, being the gritty character that he is, Paul decided to take up golf.

He later joined the Disabled Golf Association and has now represented his country 12 times, playing of a respectable handicap of 16. He works hard to promote understanding and empathy for disability and hates any form of discrimination in golf!

 

Used Golf Balls – yes or no?

Wednesday, December 7th, 2016

used-golf-balls-tin-cupIf you’ve played golf long enough, you’ve probably had that “Tin Cup” moment?

It might not have come on a par 5 but on a par 3 but you basically find yourself pumping most of your ball supply into the greenside water, as you stubbornly try to reach the green over a hazard.

But what’s more painful, the nine you made on the hole, or the dozen golf balls you just lost?

If you’re like most regular golfers, it’s the £15-40 a dozen you just drowned.

Of course, if they’re used golf balls, it’s far less painful.

Used Golf Balls – The Prejudice…

Sadly, there’s certainly a stigma associated with playing used golf balls. But why?

If we find a good one (such as a Titleist Pro V1)  in the trees, most of us will feel like we’ve won the lottery but if you buy used golf balls, you may be considered a cheapskate, but what’s the difference?

For some reason buying recycled or used golf balls is beneath many players. Yet, it was so long ago – post-recession – that we were all quick to return to the days or

Yet, it was so long ago – post-recession – that we were all quick to return to the days of ‘Make do and Mend’.

After all, these golf balls are usually harvested from ponds, streams and lakes, but surely the water has to be bad for them, right?

Well, that’s true but probably to a much lesser degree than you think and it used to be truer than it is now.

Used Golf Balls – The Truth…

The golf manufacturers have long made claims that balls recovered from water lose a significant amount of performance yet much of that was before the solid core technology and advanced cover materials used today.

The truth is, golf balls are so well made today that they can spend a few weeks in the water and come out just fine, at least for casual play. (I mean, if you’re playing in the U.S. Open qualifier, by all means break out the new sleeves.)

The good news, today, the companies that sell millions of used golf balls harvest lakes regularly, so they’re not spending much time in the water.

In addition, the used golf balls are sold according to grade, so you get what you pay for.

It also depends on where the golf balls are lost.

Buy the top-graded used golf balls, and it’s almost impossible to tell from new.

In fact, some golfers have been known to buy high-grade used golf balls and put them back in their old sleeves.

used golf ballsUsed Golf Balls – Who supplies them….

One of the UKs largest online retailers of used golf balls www.premierlakeballs.com

The company was started in 2003 by Scott Phillips, a ‘+1 golfer’ who saw the savings used golf balls offered and the business has grown year on year since it started.

The reason being that PEARL grade lake balls offer the exact same performance as a new ball and offer HUGE savings.

“We ship a lot of golf balls across Europe and no doubt they find there way back to us said Phillips

He’s joking to a degree, but it is conceivable that you could actually buy your own golf balls back after you dunk one in a pond.

After all, in 2015 Premier Lakeballs sold between 1.8-2 million golf balls across the EU and UK.

Phillips says “All we ask is try us once and you will never buy a new ball again

 


By Ian Mullins